Posted in Farming

Moving Aunt Donna’s Garden (and how to create a cottage garden)

We climbed out of the truck at Aunt Donna’s house. My cousin and I fought back a few tears at the thought that she wasn’t here. Nor will she be again. Her gardens were so dry, but the snap dragons and the huge trees stayed true to Aunt Donna’s garden with color and life. We were there to pick up wood for my new wood stove.

My Great-Aunt Donna

Janet and I walked around the back yard reminiscing. The old swing that used to hold family laughing, rocking back and forth. The family gatherings on the porch.

My Andy and Emily on Aunt Donna’s swing at one of the many family get-togethers we had at her house.

The decades old rhubarb was gone. The apple tree looked the same but with no apples. A broken limb hung from its girth.

I went to the shed and found all of her tools still in place. I took a shovel and went to the Oregon Grape Root that I always gather this time of year from her house. The last time, most likely. The house will be sold soon after the estate sale.

I filled a small bucket of water. I pulled up some of the Echinacea and placed it in the water. I dug up a few Sumac tree starts that had scampered away from the large trees. “Come with me, kids,” I said to the silent plants, “we are moving to a new garden.”

My own land here isn’t ready to plant. There is no amended soil. Just limestone and clay as far as the eye can see. The previous owner put in a small strip of garden along the front of the house with a plant every few feet for curb appeal to help the house sell. You know me and inter-planting; no soil unused! I filled in some of the spaces.

It is very easy to transplant anywhere you live.

  1. Simply dig a hole.
  2. Water the hole.
  3. Let it drain.
  4. Sprinkle a little organic garden soil in the hole.
  5. Put plant in the hole.
  6. Cover with soil.
  7. Give a little more water.
  8. Talk to it and tell it how happy it will be here if it will grow!
Sumac and a stone from Aunt Donna’s garden.

I do this every time I plant a tree or transplant a plant or bush. To prevent weeds and to keep invasive plants in place, put cardboard around the plants and top it all off with wood chips or straw. Everything looks beautiful, there was no need to rototille everything, and one can fit a lot of plants in a seemingly small area. It is the secret to creating a sprawling, cottage garden.

Pinterest.

I will increase the size of the garden next year with the same technique and establish a walkway. A hundred medicinal herbs and more flowers and pleasing plants will join the garden. It won’t be Aunt Donna’s garden, but with any luck, her plants will thrive here and I will have a little piece of her spirit in my cottage garden.

Posted in Herbal Remedies

How to Kick a Virus in One Night (homemade antibiotic)

I felt it coming on.  The obvious swollen lymph node even though I felt fine.  My eyes started to get more tired.  My friend asked if I was okay.  I had rocked a sick toddler for two days before so I made a mental note to take some antibiotics when I got home.  Not pharmaceutical antibiotics, intense plant medicines.  This is the timeline of a common virus faced with its nemesis, the herbal antibiotic.  The herbal antibiotic is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-yeast, anti-fungal, anti-microbial, and anti-stay-in-bed-sick.

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I took two droppers of my antibiotic (1 teaspoon).  I use the alcohol based one because it goes straight to the blood stream.  A half hour later I did it again.  All through the night I would wake up feeling the illness coming on and would take two more droppers, letting them hover in the back of my throat until I swallowed.  None of this, “Take 5 drops of watered down tincture crap” as stated in some herbal books and bottles.  People, this is war.  Take your medicine!  The plants want to help you.  They won’t harm you.  The viruses get stronger and stronger each year.  Let’s outsmart them with what was intended to protect us.

So, here is the ugly part.  Come early morning you will run to the sink and start hocking up everything that was going to try and lodge in your lungs and become a wretched cough.  Continue taking the antibiotic mixed with an elderberry syrup or honey (click here for recipe) as needed.  If the cold has already taken hold before one can attack it, then take the antibiotic and elderberry concoction several times a day.  But, fighting early is always the best attack.

Tried and True Antibiotic

This concoction contains berberine which inhibits the growth of bacteria and effectively breaks down the protective wall of staph infections.  This extract is effective against common viruses as well as severe infections. 

1 Tablespoon of goldenseal

1/2 Tablespoon of Oregon grape root

1/2 Tablespoon of Barberry

1/2 Tablespoon of Echinacea

Combine in a pint sized canning jar and fill to 1/2 inch from lid with vodka, rum, or brandy. Let sit in sun for a week.  This will work at that point but it will be much stronger if you let it then sit in a cupboard for two weeks and place it in the full moon (frequency change).  A total of four weeks is good measure.  Pray over your medicine and have a happy heart and good intentions as you make it.  It does make a difference.

Take 2 droppers at a time.  They can be added to a small shot glass of orange juice for ease of taking.  This is safe for children.  One can add it to small glasses of juice to hide it.  Small children would take half the dose.

(You are also welcome to come to my store or order by phone if you wish someone else to make it! http://whitewolfherbs.com)