Making Rosehip Meade- Part 2 (bottling)

Just a sip from atop the dredges.  I sat outside on my front porch in the cool air in my rocking chair, watching the birds in my trees, while smelling the contents of my small glass.  There was a only a few tablespoons in it.  A little rough yet, but the underlying aromas of flowers and apples came dancing up from the honey liqueur.  Ah, yes, this will be quite lovely come June.

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‘Twas time to bottle the meade, my friends.  Meade is a honey wine that can be spelled with or without the e but I do love my words to be pretty so I shall keep the e on the end of my meade.  I knew the gallon jug was ready to be bottled because all the blurping and slight bubbling had ceased and all was calm in the carboy (the twirly thing on top.)  Out came the siphon and the tube.

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I would love to have a system with corks and all that but I can afford jars with stoppers at this point and the bottles are lovely and they do just fine.  They have been in the dusty root cellar so a soapy bath was first on the list.  Make sure everything is super clean.

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Now, remove the carboy and the lid from the wine.  Take the cap off the bottom of the siphon pump.  Warm the end of the tube in tap hot water to loosen and shimmy that thing onto the other end of the siphon.  Place the pump in the wine and the tube in your first jar.  Pump contents in, leaving about an inch or so headspace.  It will continue evolving in the jar.  This is a live product and a lovely one at that!

Try not to pull up the sludge from the very bottom as you siphon.  That is where the yeast and remaining plant matter falls.  I was able to get three 32 ounce bottles filled.  Lid secured, they will set in the root cellar for six months or until a good midsummer party.  Best drunk by moonlight and near an outdoor fire pit.

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Wash everything well and in the spring we will make dandelion wine!

Making Rosehip Meade- part 1

Meade, which is honey wine, is one of the oldest beverages noted in history.  It’s beginnings simply a way to preserve the harvest.  A way to make medicine.  When the water wasn’t safe to drink, alcohol was a safe drink.  Beer and wine are simply fermentations, preserving techniques.

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The number one task for a homesteader is to get everything done timely.  One can’t wait too long or we miss the opportunity.  Rosehips should be harvested just before frost.  However a few days after frost is when I gathered my basket and began to harvest the delicious fruits.  Rose hips are the bulb left after the rose is gone.  It is ready when it turns red.  The fruit is one of the highest sources of vitamin c.  Their medicinal quality is that they are an effective anti-inflammatory and really nice for joints and arthritis in the winter months.

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As it would happen, I missed my chance by a bit but did manage to harvest a cup and half of rosehips.  As I passed the fragrant lavender hiding beneath a pile of leaves, I couldn’t help but snip a bit of that too.  The intention was to make rosehip wine.

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As I decocted the rosehips, I tried to figure out the ratio to make a smaller batch of wine with my humble two cups of herbs when I thought of honey.  That would be delicious with it.  Then I realized I could make Meade and the herbs will just make it better.

Rosehip Meade

In a saucepan, combine 1 1/2 cups of rosehips and 1/2 cup of lavender stems and leaves.  (You can use any herb or berry) with 4 cups of water.

Boil for 10 minutes.  Smash with a potato masher a few times during the process and at the end.  Put lid on and let sit for 8 hours.

Meanwhile, dissolve 4 cups of honey in 11 cups of very warm water.

You can get a jug and lid with a carboy (the nifty aerator thing) at a beer and wine making supply shop or online.

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Strain herbs through a sieve lined with cheesecloth.  Pour juice and honey mixture into a gallon wine making jar.  Leave a little space from the top (see picture) to allow air flow and bubbling.  Add 1/5 of a package of white wine yeast and stir well.

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Replace lid and add carboy.  Pour enough vodka or rum into the carboy to the lines as a disinfectant.  (Leave it in there.  The air bubbles through it.  Most recipes call for a chemical but I’d rather use alcohol.)  Set on counter out of the sun for 4-6 weeks until bubbling stops.

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I have noticed that red wine yeast really puts on a show, and the white wine yeast is a bit more subtle.  As long as everything goes well, we will meet back here to bottle it!  We will be enjoying it by our Midsummer party!

How to Clear, Protect, Increase Positive Energy, and Set a Shield with Incense

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Whenever you have people over.  Whenever something amazing happens.  Whenever a fight occurs.  All these things leave impressions on the energy of your home.  Have you ever walked into a home, particularly when you are house hunting, and you can feel the energy, good or bad, in the place?  Some shops feel great to be in.  Some homes feel comfortable to be at.  That is the energy.

I think we can all agree that the world we live in is not black and white.  It’s not spiritual realm verses physical realm, but rather a more interspersed and parallel existence we share.  I have people at my house often and I work as a medical intuitive and a medium.  Things can get funny around here.  I had set up a good perimeter around our yard and for a long time it worked, people walking by me could not see me wave, never came in the gate without being invited, they would just walk on by.  Recently I keep getting strange folks coming to the door.  Electronics have been acting weird.  A raven…a raven y’all (not normal)…was cawing so loudly in front of my house it drew me to the porch to see what he wanted.  Then I felt something touch my back.  Time to smudge!

Now traditional smudging is how I was taught but it is not that easy to keep it lit and balance a feather, a lighter, and a shell.  My husband and I have used incense with great success and it is far easier to wield and has a lovely glowing tip which just feels like magic as you swirl the smoke.  Never use just sage to smudge with.  Such a common myth.  You have to combine herbs.  Sage itself opens portals and you will end up with a house full!  We used incense sticks of sage and lavender.

We started in the basement.  He went with the sun (clockwise) and I went with the earth (counter clockwise) around each space muttering to ourselves.  Ask for protection.  Ask that only those that walk in the light remain.  Ask for blessings.  Express gratitude.  Raise the energy so that only love and positivity remains.  We then did the upstairs.  Then we went outside under the ink dark sky and dancing stars with the bright moon leading.  Around the perimeter of the yard we watched the bold red tips of the incense sticks and smoke swirl and permeate the air.  Create a barrier.  Create a force field, if you will.  It is up to you to keep the energy strong and protection in place.  The powers that be will help you when called on but you can’t just say a quick prayer and expect it to be done.  YOU are responsible and truly able to wield the power and wisdom necessary to have a safe haven and a positive energetic space.  The whole universe conspires to help you when you go through the process of raising energy for a purpose.

Some spritzes of witch hazel infused with essential oils like sage, cedar, sandalwood, lavender, rose, and frankincense around doorways and in the air will help set the blessing.

This should be done as often as needed.  You will certainly feel the difference.  It is empowering knowing that there is a way to protect your home and loved ones while cleansing the air and creating a beautiful, comfortable space to dwell.

The Many Uses of Lavender

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Lavender has so many lovely uses, many that you may not be aware of.  Lavender easily grows in a pot on the porch.  Opt for English lavender.  Folks do tend to only think of French lavender which is astounding with its single stems and fields of purple waves but French just won’t stand up in our climate.  English lavender develops a nice woody base and with a good straw covering will survive in winter if planted in the garden.

Lavender is wonderful in food.  Add it to thyme, oregano, or basil when preparing dishes.  It also makes a very nice tea.  Blend it with any black tea, Earl Grey is nice, or a green tea with lemon and lavender is unique and refreshing.  Lavender boiled with simple syrup to make lavender lemonade is astounding.

Medicinally lavender works in many ways.  It is a mild nervine, or pain reliever.  It levels out stronger nervines like skullcap, valerian, or California poppies.  It won’t work on its own for pain, but is a great supporting actor.  It also helps with stomach upset along with lemon balm and mint.

It is a star in healing emotional issues.  Just think about smelling or seeing lavender.  It instantly improves mood.  It does that internally as well.  It is used with hawthorn, St. John’s Wort, and roses for severe depression.  By itself it can lighten one’s spirits and helps heal heartbreak.

It can be added to smudge herbs to help infuse love and positivity into a space.

The essential oil can be used topically (never ingest essential oils, not even multi-marketing ones!) directly on wounds or bug bites.  Put on pimples to make them vanish. Use with aloe on a burn.

Lavender has many helpful uses.  If you pick up a plant from the nursery today you will have your own lavender medicine at the ready!