Posted in Homestead

How an Old Fashioned Life Benefits HSPs

What is an HSP? I first heard the term Highly Sensitive Person some dozen years ago. It is used to describe someone who is very sensitive and emotional. Words such as empath have come forth, but there are differences. An empath is someone who feels others’ emotions and feels empathy for them. My husband is an empath, but he is not an HSP.

I wish that more parents knew the traits of a highly sensitive person. They might recognize their own child and know better how to raise them. The HSP is generally the black sheep of the family because they are not easy to live with. They are emotional, anxious, and not like other kids.

HSPs are highly sensitive to artificial lights. Fluorescents can nearly take us out! (Or so it feels.) HSP’s are sensitive to sound. They are generally born with heightened sensory. So very loud voices, yelling, loud music, and crowds can leave an HSP in tears. School is usually very difficult for an HSP, as they would rather be anywhere but sitting still. They are also usually the targets for bullying. And not just as children. It is hard to be an HSP in the world today.

There are many great traits of highly sensitive people. HSP’s are wonderfully mesmerized by beauty and that rubs off on the people around them. They notice every bird, every color, every sound, the tastes of food, the moment in which they live. They are loyal friends and sensitive family members. Their empathy is beyond an average empath, because they physically feel what they see or what they are around. For instance, I cannot watch the news, because I physically will feel what someone who was beaten or raped or lost felt. That can be exhausting. An HSP has to be wary of what they see and what they read and who they are around. Highly Sensitive People are often psychic, because all of their senses are heightened. It isn’t far fetched to believe that hermits are all highly sensitive people! Maybe we don’t want to become hermits, but that is where living an old fashioned life comes in.

Last night, my husband and I sat in our rocking chairs listening to records by the light of oil lamps and candles. The calm of evening resets my senses and helps me to breathe. My friends and I joke that I become a pumpkin after nine. A kind way of saying I straight fall apart and end up crying after ten! I honor my circadian rhythms and that helps me to stay happy and relaxed.

To incorporate old fashioned living for a HSP is simple, here are some ideas:

Highly sensitive people need softer light. Oil lamps, candles, and twinkly lights all fit the bill.

I am overjoyed that I inherited my Great Aunt Donna’s record player the other day! Soft music is better than blasting music.

Highly sensitive people cannot deal with anger problems and fighting. Soft voices, sweet words, this is more important than I can describe.

Turn off electronics. The television overstimulates highly sensitive people. (We won’t get into video games.) The sound, the light, (the fact that there is nothing good on except The Voice…) it is often too much. Books and creative outlets are better. LED lights can be switched off. Unplug anything with a light shining from it.

Highly Sensitive People are better homeschooled and as entrepreneurs. Home should be a respite so decorate with comforting pieces, like quilts, musical instruments, books, soft lighting, and old fashioned items from a relatives’ house. My house is filled with memories since I use things that were once my grandma’s, my chosen mama’s, my aunt’s, etc.

Spend lots of time outdoors! HSP’s do better outdoors. Grow a garden, have chickens, and chairs that face the sun. Animals are important.

From scratch cooking and herbal remedies are important for health. HSP’s don’t do well with conventional medicines or vaccines. You will find that many HSP’s are vegetarian.

Highly Sensitive People do not have a disease or a disability and it is not something they can just get over or toughen up. All of the HSP’s I have met have been truly loving, extraordinary people. I think the lifestyle that we can create to accommodate an HSP is one that could benefit everyone! Being present, being positive, avoiding hysteria in the news and on social media, filling time with creative pursuits and great books, spending time with ones we love, honoring our circadian rhythm, improving health, slowing down, being easy on our senses; all these things make life a million times more meaningful.

Posted in Herbal Remedies

Never Fear a Virus Again

Those old survival instincts like to create panic and the news loves to induce it. Viruses have been around since the beginning of time, I’m betting, and many have become worse because of our own doing. We have created drugs that are making the bacteria morph and resist. Perhaps illness and natural disaster are ways for the earth to control population. Whispers about government conspiracy trying to control population abound but we do enough damage ourselves with pollution, drilling for oil, animal agriculture, GMO’s, and lifestyle, so we needn’t worry about the government! Let’s just get down to it, a virus is a virus. It’s a cold- sometimes a bad one- but a cold nonetheless. Now, turn off the news and let’s get some tried and true remedies into your homestead apothecary so you don’t have to worry about the flu, the Coronavirus, or a sinus infection. We are not trying to come up with cures or shun doctors, we are trying to prevent and catch things early.

Oregon Grape Root

The good thing about new viruses is that they are none the wiser about our western herbs. If you think herbs are just mild immunity boosters, think again. I’m not talking essential oils or tea bags here, I make herbal medicine that is more effective than anything that big pharma can come up with. Nature is more than happy to help you heal and live a life that does not revolve around fear of getting sick. So, let’s get started.

First, where do you get these herbs? I highly suggest you grow them. Many of our best allies are becoming endangered and extinct. In a few months, seek out a plant nursery that sells plant starts. If you live in Colorado, two of my favorites that have tons of medicinal herbs are Tagawa Gardens in Parker and Desert Canon in Canon City. No yard or green thumb or it’s winter? You can order online. Just google “organic echinacea.” You can find reputable, small farmers that sell it. Or you can go with one of the bigger companies like Mountain Rose Herbs or Starwest Botanicals.

Here are some herbs to start gathering. Try to get one from each section.

For Sinus infections you need an antifungal:

  • Walnut (leaves or hull), black walnut even better.
  • Garlic
  • Mugwort

For Sore Throat:

  • Bear Root (Osha) is a great antibiotic
  • Cinnamon
  • Peppermint

To stop the sniffles:

  • Stinging Nettles
  • Peppermint
  • Dandelion
  • Rose Hips

For lungs you need a cough suppressant:

  • Mullein leaves and flowers
  • Valerian
  • Willow Bark

To break a fever:

  • Willow Bark
  • Feverfew
  • Catnip

To open airways:

  • Ephedra (no it’s not dangerous. You will probably need to grow it. It is not illegal to use it or sell it. The bastardized version from the lab, ephedrine, caused all the trouble back in the days of quick weight loss.)
  • Mormon Tea (the American version of Ephedra)
  • Thyme
  • Indian Tobacco (Lobelia Inflata)

Specifically Anti-Viral:

  • Echinacea (also anti-cancer and anti-biotic)
  • Yarrow
  • Lemon Balm
  • Sage

Specifically Anti-biotic:

  • Juniper Berries
  • Oregon Grape Root
  • Barberry Root
  • Bear Root
  • Garlic
Echinacea

In a quart jar add 8 Tablespoons of dried herbs of choice (try one from each category) and fill 3/4 of the way with rum and 1/4 of the way with honey or agave. Sit in sun for a week, then move to a cupboard, shaking occasionally, for 3 more weeks. Don’t strain, just pull out what you need. Take 1 teaspoon when everyone is sick around you, 1 teaspoon 6x a day when sick.

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Now, it’s all well and good to take herbal medicines to heal, but if one continually taxes their system, the herbs will only go so far. Other ways to boost immunity:

Green smoothies and juices once a day are very important for antioxidant and vitamin intake.

Fresh air while walking or riding a bicycle.

Stress reduction

Surround yourself with people and things you love and do work that is meaningful to you.

Eat a plant based diet so that you are eating as many antioxidants and minerals as possible.

Don’t let fear attack you. There are bits of fate we have no control of and there are things we can do proactively. Let’s just live and let the universe take care of the rest. A home apothecary will take away many of your fears and help you be ready for anything.

Intrigued? My books on Amazon can help you navigate the world of herbalism even further.

Posted in Beauty/Health

Envision Your Future (Your Best Life, day 7 and recap)

A few years ago I organized a group of witchy, like-minded women. We post memes and prayer requests and encouragement and meet every few months over coffee or pottery or wine to catch up. Yesterday, my daughter, Shyanne hosted our second annual Vision Board event. Everyone came baring old magazines, scissors, markers, stickers, glue, and ideas for a good life.

This is my favorite event. We fall into the photos of magazines and laugh and yell out, “If you see a picture of _____, tell me!” We create words and promises and our future. We compare them to last year’s boards and talk about what all manifested (almost all of the ideas), and what has changed. How much a life can change in a year’s span.

Living in the present is important and breathing in memories of today will keep us focused and filled with gratitude. The past is bittersweet and the future is unknown and filled with equal parts fate and decision. The vision board is our decision part. It helps clarify where we are and where we want to be. Just like writing things down, the vision board takes ramblings of thought and places them into a road map for the year. And effective way to create one’s best life.

Today, create your own vision board. Or better yet, arrange a group of friends to come over and create as well. Riding lessons optional.

Recap:

  • Guard your mind.
  • Become your own doctor.
  • Adopt a plant based lifestyle.
  • Improve your relationships.
  • Change your perspective.
  • Honor your spirituality.
  • Envision your future.

It may seem like my series on How to Live Your Best Life is a bit extreme. Indeed, not everyone will be willing to follow all of these practices. I, myself, follow these practices and I can tell you that they work. Guarding my mind gives me peace of mind as I am not filling it with fear and negativity. Becoming my own doctor puts power back in my own hands because I know how to make medicine and how to treat many issues. Adopting a plant based diet has given me permission to love every animal I see without guilt, has greatly improved my health, and has eliminated depression. The phone calls I have been making have made me feel closer to those I love and have connected me to people beyond the screen. Changing my words has given me more gratitude for everything I have. Honoring my spirituality has connected me to the unseen world around me. And envisioning my future has secured my path towards an even better existence.

Thanks for following this week and I wish you an amazing 2020.

Posted in Beauty/Health

Plant Based (Your Best Life, day 3)

A fellow blogger and friend of mine used to write about butchering deer on her kitchen table. She was the quintessential farmer’s wife. She wrote often about her life with autoimmune issues. It practically paralyzed her. She was very ill. One day she got upset about something she read and set out to prove that veganism was not healthy, but the more she researched, the more she became intrigued. She went vegan. I would have never expected it! She lost forty pounds and all of her autoimmune and health issues went away. She now writes about healthy living and promotes a plant based diet. She also appreciated that she could look at her animals with a new compassion.

There are thousands of stories like Eileen’s. A plant based diet reverses and heals disease and illness. There are many athletes who prove that a vegan diet builds muscle and improves stamina. When one incorporates a plant based diet in their life, a lot changes. It changes one’s perception about the creatures we share this planet with. That maybe they are not all here for us to kill and consume. And maybe just because that is how it has always been, doesn’t mean it needs to be like that in the future.

Okay, so perhaps you are interested in ditching Diabetes, skin issues, heart problems, anxiety, autoimmune issues, cancer cells, and brain fog, but there are questions!

These are the top five questions I get from folks:

  1. Where do you get your protein? One slice of whole wheat bread contains 5 grams of protein! You will not be lacking in protein. Greens, grains, nuts, seeds, mushrooms, and many other foods contain protein.
  2. But aren’t grains bad? Only if you work for a marketing campaign trying to sell you gluten free stuff. It’s incredibly rare for folks to be Celiac. Grains are filled with fiber, protein, and anti-cancer antioxidants. Obviously pastries and Wonder bread aren’t filled with healthy stuff, so stick with whole grains and as unprocessed as you can.
  3. We have incisors, so we were meant to be carnivores, right? If you look at road kill on the side of the road and start salivating or can catch a rabbit and bite into it, sure. But no, our systems resemble herbivores biologically.
  4. But what about all the stuff being shipped in from all over the world? Vegans are very hard on the environment. Is anyone eating truly local? That orange juice and banana weren’t grown in Denver! Our goal as a species is to begin eating closer to home. Not only eating closer to home, but growing our food at our home! It has nothing to do with being vegan.
  5. But how will you get B12? That is only available in animal sources. False! Oh my, there is a lot of misleading information out there. There is B12 in kombucha, nutritional yeast, and traces on garden grown vegetables. And while we are at it, you get plenty of iron from greens and grains.
  6. Oh and a bonus question. But soy is bad for you, right? Organic soy (along with herbs that help balance estrogen, like Black Cohosh) do not disrupt estrogen production, they balance it. Soy is used to help osteoporosis and strengthens bones. GMO, field grown soy is a different thing altogether.

It is not that hard. Just plan ahead. You will feel so good eating all those beautiful plant foods and you will not be hungry. There has never been an easier time to be vegan. So, today, pick up a vegan cookbook or look at some Instagram pages for inspiration. Health and compassion are a big part of living your best life.

Posted in Beauty/Health

Be Your Own Pharmacist (Your Best Life, day 2)

“There’s an herb for that!” my students and I used to joke. There is, quite literally, an herb for every single ailment known to man. (Hint: it’s not marijuana.) When men wanted profit, they mimicked constituents in plants in a lab, changing their genetic form so that they could be patented. Along with greed though, there were side effects. Listen closely to commercials and read the fine print; cancer is one of the leading side effects, amongst so many other serious chronic illnesses. All to treat things that can be reversed by lifestyle.

True, it is easier to pop a pill, but the medical model as we know it is not what it should be. Modern medicine was developed for trauma care on the battlefields. Never were we intended to go to urgent care for the sniffles. A typical trip to the veterinarian will set you back hundreds and may or may not help the situation. Once you step on that wheel of medicine, it is hard to get off.

I could go on about how big AG and big Pharma are mega-forces that have brainwashed us and keep us under their thumbs out of fear, but I don’t want to get too negative here, so let’s turn it around. You can completely change your life (and quite possibly the ones around you as well) by learning how to treat thyself. By having a growing knowledge of what herbs treat what, how, and how to blend and make them into medicine, you can be your own pharmacist, nurse, and doctor to yourself, your loved ones, and your animals. Not only will one save thousands of dollars, but one can also completely turn one’s health around. And being healthy is one of the keys to living your best life.

There are so many ailments that can successfully be reversed, or at worst, managed. Most of our common ailments are from diet, lifestyle, and more prevalent, medications. Now, forget genetics. You are your environment.

I have worked full time for over a decade as a Master Herbalist, so I have seen what really good herbal medicine can do and how it changes people’s lives. Find an amazing herbalist (try my daughter, http://whitewolfherbs.com) (you will need to find someone that does more than essential oils; those are for aromatherapy), or better yet, learn yourself. Empower yourself. Being in control of your health is imperative to living your best life.

Today, pick up a book at the library or bookstore and start reading about basic herbalism. (Do not look on the internet, as most sites about herbs are going to be big pharma run.) I like Rosemary Gladstar, Tammi Hartung, and of course, I am rather partial to my own books on the matter. You can find them at http://AuthorKatieSanders.com. I even have a full text book to teach yourself how to be a full working herbalist and two recipe books to turn your kitchen into a pharmacy. You will have a lot of fun in the process.

Posted in Beauty/Health

7 Days, 7 Ways to Your Best Life (Intro)

Be the Change You Want to See in the World.

Gandhi

I have nothing to sell you. (Heck, I don’t even use ads on my blog.) I write to inspire. I write to help others who are even quasi interested in how we live, to use it to make their life better. In the next 7 days, I will cover 7 things that are guaranteed to add up exponentially to change your life for the better. To change it radically in some ways. To change how you live here on this earth. How you get the most from it and how it can change your family’s life and all those you encounter. How to get the most from life while contributing the most back. There are new skills and new ways of thinking to consider and old habits and society’s status quo to crush. There are dreams to follow and a really, really great life to live.

Photo from internet

And I guarantee that if you follow my seven ideas to their end, you will reverse your chronic health problems and be the healthiest and most vibrant you have ever been. You will help the environment and your own way of life, making the earth a better place. You will have more compassion and better relationships. You will ditch anxiety and depression and feel peace. Because every little change adds up. Every time we better ourselves, the better we make life for those around us and for future generations. It’s a big deal. You ready? I will see you in the morning.

Posted in Animals/Chickens

The Wishy-Washy Writer (and kindness to all)

This is the story of a wishy-washy writer (therefore all her business is out there confusing the world) and her battles with what is right, and what makes us well, and what serves the most people and animals, yet finding what is beneficial to us (because if we aren’t happy then we can’t inspire others).

This is the story of a wishy-washy writer who was vegetarian for twenty-seven years, vegan for two, then on-and-off again meat eater-then-vegan since. It is about this time each year that I become fiercely ill. My body absolutely rebels against its half a year of animal products. One year it felt like I had a hole in my stomach. One year the gout was terrible. Then there was the chronic swelling of my lymph nodes for over a year. Then the intense stomach issues. This year I am on my third week of hives and stomach issues. Every year in my journal I write, “Next time I want to start eating meat again…read this!” But alas, we inevitably go on vacation, go to a friend’s house, read a book about being a locavore or the poisons of processed food and we are back to a freezer full of meat, pretending to be pioneers until I get sick again and neither of us are feeling so hot.

Every year, I frantically erase all of the posts from the six months before. When I am vegan, I erase the posts about raising animals for meat and recipes. When I am a meat eater, I erase all the animal sanctuary posts. Vegans (even the word, vegan) can sound annoying and frantic and extreme. I have inspired a lot of people to become vegan over the years and those folks are adamant and heartfelt in their work. I feel the same but then I think it may be so hypocritical. We simply cannot go through this life without causing death to other species. From petroleum use to clearing farm fields, every time you pop an Advil, or buy plastic, we aide in the death of others.

It is easier to just consume animal products. Then you don’t have to be the annoying one at the holiday dinner or the irritated one at a restaurant. You don’t have to get creative trying to make goat cheese out of almonds. I want goats. I don’t necessarily look forward to milking. And in my heart I know that taking the baby away and then sending it to slaughter if it is a boy, and drinking the milk after my own mother’s breast milk has many decades past dried up, is probably weird, if not wrong, and probably not that healthy. I don’t know y’all. Does anyone else have these dilemmas constantly bantering in their heads and hearts?

After I get sick each year, after I take on a plant based diet again, I always get better. Every ailment that ails me heals itself on a plant-based diet. Every time I have meat on my plate, I have less room for antioxidant-rich grains, vegetables, proteins, and fruit. Can you be a locavore and eat a plant-based diet? (And if we are honest, are any of us really eating that local?)

Here is the thing, I don’t even like the feeling of eating gooey, greasy cheese and I don’t even like meat! But it is so easy in our society. On this farm, am I really going to look in the eyes of an infant or old farm animal and decide they are going to die? I don’t think it is right to kill elephants or horses or cats for food….in other places it is acceptable….why do I think some animals are just destined for the plate? I could never look in the eyes of a moose or or deer and pull the trigger to end its beautiful life. I don’t know. These are real battles in my heart and mind and the way a writer delves into those recesses of questioning is to write.

I wonder how many people have chronic illnesses that can be blamed on their food choices, but because it is so hard to change them in our society, they will never make that change or get well.

And wouldn’t I rather be an example of kindness to all?

(If you leave a comment, please make sure it is respectful. There are probably no right or wrong answers here!)

Posted in So You Want to Be a Homesteader Series

The Homegrown, Healthy Life (So You Want to Be a Homesteader #16)

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, somewhere during women’s liberation we got led astray.  The frozen dinner folks were ready to pounce.  “Yes, women, go get a job!  We’ll take care of dinner.”  Every convenience began to show up, pushing women into the work force in droves.  Children left raising themselves and food being neatly packaged in factories in other countries.  Oh, and we still get to do all the housework!

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I am thankful for the ability to vote and that my daughters can be lawyers if they so choose, but I will take my original jobs back, thank you very much.  My father-in-law wondered when I am getting a job.  Let me tell y’all about my job and earnings.

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When you gaze down fluorescent lighted grocery shelves with the sounds of bad music and customers in the background, do you ever wonder where the food came from?  Or ever wondered what would happen in an emergency and you couldn’t come shop these aluminum and box lined shelves?  Have you read the ingredients?  Lord, have mercy.  A good 50% of all those foods are poison.  Not to mention grown who knows where, handled by who knows who, sprayed with who knows what.  I am my own food preserver.  I can, I dry, I fill my own grocery store shelves with nutritious, delicious foods.

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I am the farmer.  I grow all of our produce for half of the year, increasing yields each season.  I grow our own chickens (a new venture, granted).  We gather our own eggs.  To fill in, I use other housewives’ farm goods; beef, pork, milk, and organic vegetables to preserve.  It takes a village of us.

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I am the cheese monger.  I make our own variety of cheese, along with yogurt and ice cream, and butter.

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I am the baker.  In my bakery I make coffee cakes, and fresh bread for sandwiches.

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I am my family’s own doctor.  I make my own medicines.  I am the veterinarian around here.

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I am the tailor.  I am the accountant.  I am a hell of a gourmet chef.  I am the winemaker.

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I make body products and cleaning products and support my husband in his job.

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I buy organic flour and coffee, sugar and nuts.  Things of that nature.  I save a ton of money by growing, bartering, supporting local farms, and doing it myself.  Just think of all the things I don’t buy!  I don’t really have time to get a job, you see.  I am busy working and giving my family a homegrown, healthy life.

 

 

Posted in So You Want to Be a Homesteader Series

Supporting Local Farms (So You Want to Be a Homesteader Day 7)

It is a good idea to try and be self sufficient enough that you feel secure.  You have water in empty jars in case the water gets turned off.  You have candles, oil lamps, and matches.  You have food preserved and a bustling garden.  You have firewood.  You have some cash in a coffee can.  Going further, it is really satisfying to raise your own food, preserve all of your own food and drinks, and make steps to be more eco-friendly and simple.  We can get pretty darn self sufficient, but really it not likely to be completely self sufficient.  Mainly because we need people.  We also cannot possibly do everything ourselves.  Supporting small, local farms in your state- as close to you as possible- is a great way to build each other up, create community, eat well, ensure humane treatment of animals, and support a more environmentally friendly path.

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We don’t have too many flour mills here in Colorado (do we have any?), and I know no one is growing coffee and sugar, so I do need to buy those.  I can choose organic or small operations to purchase from.  I grow most of our vegetables for the summer and fall here on my urban farm, but it is always nice to head to the farmer’s market and buy some fruit or unique vegetables from the organic farmers there.  We talk about bugs, weather, family, recipes.  I can also get extra produce to preserve if I didn’t grow enough. The money stays in the community, amongst friends.

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Most of the homestead authors I enjoy reading started out as vegetarians.  Many of us have felt strongly about vegetarianism before.  Many of my farmer friends were vegetarians.  We care about the environment.  We care about animals.  So, once we see that tofu and bananas wreck the ozone as much as anything with all the fuel and deforestation required, and that GMO crops (the basis of many a veggie burger), and factory farming are what are destroying our health and our beautiful planet, it makes a farmgirl step back and reassess.

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There are lovely, caring farms and ranches, many around you, that lovingly grow animals for meat and gently send them off into the night.  A world away from the pain and stench of factory farming.  My meat chickens got lots of kisses and lots of sunshine and were dead in less time than it takes to blink.  No pain.

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The key to curing many of our environmental, social, and health problems can be found in our food choices.  By purchasing as much local as possible, from real people in your community, who don’t use pesticides and herbicides, who have bills to pay, and a smile to offer you, and authentic conversation, we can reverse disease, destruction, and separation.  Local is where our food should come from.  As close as possible.  Your back yard is even better.  It is possible to eat primarily local, it just takes some planning and networking on social media and at farmer’s markets to find everything you need.

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I despise the dairy industry and do not want to support them.  Yesterday I visited a small farm thirty minutes from mine where a gorgeous, tanned farmgirl showed me around.  She loves each and every one of the newly hatched chicks that ran by chirping, the bucks who got out and created a lot of babies this year, the old goats, the babies frolicking with their mothers, the pigs, the dogs, the land, that life.  I packed three gallons of delicious, fresh milk into my car.  Today I am making cheese and ice cream.

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Local is not more expensive.  Creating a good network of fellow farmers and ranchers is imperative to becoming a successful homesteader.

Posted in Farming, Food/Wine (and preserving)

An Epiphany for Change (is there any real food out there anymore?)

An epiphany.  How many times do we hear things, read things, learn things before we finally GET IT?

“I’m so glad I’m not an addict,” I say to my husband, laughing, “I have zero self control!”  We were out again.  Out to eat even though we had food at home, we didn’t have the money to be eating out, and I knew damn well that I would feel terrible after eating at a restaurant.  And yet, every couple of days I get to craving something and give in.  Oh, it’s never fresh salad or anything like that.

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“What if,” I ventured, “all of the preservatives and chemicals and refined oils in the food are actually addictive and that is why we keep having to eat out even though we don’t really want to?”  I didn’t need an answer.  We already knew.  I am an addict.  And it started long before I ever heard of a GMO or MSG or chemical food.

I casually looked at the ingredients of the bag of organic, gluten free, healthy chips that I packed into Doug’s lunch.  And there, quietly hidden among the organic ingredients with asterisks by them, were two ingredients.  Natural flavors and citric acid.  Natural flavors is a chemical creation with derivatives of MSG and GMO ingredients.  Citric acid is GMO black mold grown on GMO corn.

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The epiphany and mild panic ensued and I realized that the reason that I cannot feel satiated with simple foods is because I have been fed chemical stuff my whole life!  Ever since the marketing folks convinced grandma and mama that convenience was their birthright, we have been subtly poisoned.

Now, I don’t want to sound like a conspiracy theorist, or anything, and I certainly don’t want to scare you, but folks, we are being poisoned.  Snacks, treats, oils, restaurant foods, it’s in my chicken’s food…everywhere we are being given doses of chemicals created to keep us coming back.  You can’t go to your friend’s house for dinner or a coffee shop for a latte without consuming these things.  Consider the extreme rates of cancers and of all the other diseases out there, and well, it’s just no wonder.

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I worry most for my grandchildren and children who would have no idea how to give up these things.  How can most people afford to grow all of their own food or cook all of their own food?  How do you give up the societal pressures of food as pleasure and company?

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Obama wrote into law that Monsanto cannot be sued.  Then Dow quietly bought Monsanto, disassembled it and GMO’s masquerade everywhere without accountability.  History tells us that unsustainable entities cannot survive but who will die first, them or us?  No better time to be getting yourself some heirloom seeds, a pressure canner, a couple of chickens, and a how-to make your own bread book.  Because what is worse than ignorance?  Complacency.