The Easiest Easter Eggs Ever

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I wrote about how to make the perfect hard boiled eggs a year ago around Easter and Passover but it deserves a second writing for all you new folks because this is the very, very best way to make hard boiled eggs!  One could use a super fresh egg straight from the coop or one that has been in the fridge for three weeks, it doesn’t matter.  It doesn’t matter that we live so ridiculously high above sea level.  The egg peels perfectly, every single time.  Of course, we aren’t boiling them at all.

I learned this trick in one of those hard core homesteading magazines that are so full of beautiful glints of information.  Place eggs in a steamer basket above boiling water, put the lid on and let the water boil under those delicious farm eggs for 35 minutes.  Remove from heat, let cool a smidge so you can handle them and then put them in the fridge.

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Maryjane Rose will be at her dad’s Sunday and the Easter Bunny will be hopping by his house but tonight is Grammie and Papa’s night!  There is a charming Easter basket above the fridge (hiding from the cats) with a monkey, some chocolate, and Easter bunny ears.  I am steaming eggs this morning and we will play with color tonight in her first Easter egg dying extravaganza and we are going to pay a visit to the Bunny himself.  I will share a picture with y’all when I get it.

I hope some of my tips make your farm (or city) life a bit easier.  Wishing you a very happy Easter!

Steamed Easter Eggs (and Seder Eggs and Egg Soup)

The higher in altitude I move the harder it is to get perfect boiled eggs.  Add in fresh, pastured eggs and forget it.  Last year I posted the Perfect Boiled Egg but that only worked with Ethel’s eggs.  I know, weird, but for some reason her white eggs just peeled perfectly every time.  We would like to have more than two eggs to hard boil though.  Easter is coming up, you know, and I have these fabulous colored eggs to work with!  Browns, some dark chocolate and some light tan, spring pink, crisp white, and sky blue…these eggs don’t even need dyeing!  But no matter how pretty they are, when I go to peel them and they are either slimy inside or by the time I take the shell off there is nothing left but the yolk, I start to get a little steamed.

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I read in Countryside magazine where a reader had written in that she steams her eggs.  I remember steaming my eggs when we lived in our first house in Parker.  The old steamer that my grandma had bought me for graduation stood on the counter with it’s timer letting us know when our eggs were done.  They were perfect every time.  When we moved to Elizabeth and then Kiowa, the altitude threw it for enough of a loop that I had to adjust the settings.  But no matter what I did, the eggs never turned out quite right.  The steamer found a new home at the Goodwill.

But here was a homesteading type gal saying to put them in a steamer basket attachment in a pot.  Which I happen to have.  So I gave it a shot.  The reader/writer had recommended thirty minutes until the perfect egg.  They came out undone and rather slimy.  I upped it to forty minutes and most of them cracked and peeled perfectly with only a few stragglers.  This week, as I prepare for Easter brunch and Maryjane’s first Easter egg hunt, I will steam them for forty-five minutes.  Perfect?  I do hope so!  I have deviled eggs, and egg salad, and egg soup in my future!  (More on that in a moment.)

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Shyanne works at a tea shop and how they peel their eggs quickly is by tapping the hollow part on top with a spoon.  Then they slide the spoon under the skin and peel it off effortlessly.  I tried and loved this.  My fingers always get a bit raw after several eggs.

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Now what the sam hill is egg soup?  My husband grew up calling it Egg in Saltwater, but somehow over the years the kids and I started referring to it as egg soup.  It is one of the first courses at his family’s Seder.  Steam and peel with a spoon a perfect farm fresh egg and place in a bowl.  Lightly cut it up with a spoon and add a half a cup to a cup of warm water and top with salt or smoked salt and pepper if you’d like.  We eat this for breakfast often.

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There are many ways to dye Easter eggs.  I am afraid that we have always used the box from the grocery store of dyes.  How very uncreative of me.  How will you dye your eggs this year?

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