Your Ideal Life (who are you? what do you want?)

Another young life snuffed out over the weekend always causes stirs in the close knit community that we lived in for so long.  Our children knew him, went to school with his siblings, we helped his mother with pain when we had our store, she too a victim of a car accident.  But this time her son was taken back to where we start and left a terrible hole in the hearts of many.

One of my close friends that I love was in a similar accident and was thrown from her vehicle.  The very same fate could have met her.

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Our lives are whispers, really.  There is no time to live a life that is not ours.  In each of us there are specific passions and interests that are meant to lead us to the life that we will have the most impact on the people around us and be the happiest.  A blueprint, if you will.  The prayers that are answered and the seemingly amazing chain of events that allows a person to live their dreams is not luck or karma, it is the path that person was supposed to follow!

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Our paths and interests change as we do.  Everything I have done would appear to have nothing in common but there are links through them all.  From modeling to dancing to herbalism to farming, I have been teaching the whole time.  I have long been interested in everything old fashioned and devoured books like Little House and Anne of Green Gables.  It is not surprising that I am here.

Now, where would you like to be?  Here are three exercises for you to write down and your path will be ever clear.  Through these you may find that you want to pursue a new hobby or completely change your lifestyle.  Maybe you want to move or maybe just take up sommelier classes!  There are no right or wrong answers.

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Exercise #1– Write down your ideal morning.  What time would you wake up?  What are you drinking?  What does your view look like?  Who are you with?  What are you doing?  Where are you?  Would this be a morning you could do every day?  How do you feel?

I wrote this down a few times and after a while I realized that I was waking up and living my ideal morning each day!  Up at dawn, quiet house, cups of coffee, writing, then sitting on the porch with the kitty when it is warm.  I feel peaceful and ready for the day.  If I am rushed in the morning, my mood is rather unattractive!

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Exercise #2– Walk through each row of the non-fiction section of the library slowly and look at each section.  Notice your reaction to each category.  What subjects pique your interest or simply make you smile?

I did this a few days ago.  I find that I smile at the books about children and the children’s section.  I love the travel section, mostly the Italian wine country memoirs.  I love the wine section and I can never leave without twenty cook books!  I love books about farming, particularly memoirs.  I enjoy fictional books about the Amish.

Five years ago I may have been obsessed with all of the herbal medicine books.  Five years before that I might have been interested in beginning gardening and decorating.

I bet librarians know a lot about their patrons just by seeing what they read.  You can find a lot of things out about yourself this way.  We tend to lose ourselves in the world.

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Exercise #3– Make four columns on a piece of paper. In the first one write everything you love in your life.  Kids, job, pets, roses, pretty table cloths, whatever.

In the second one write down everything that causes you stress. Why?  Is there a way to change your reaction, your situation, or is it something you can get out of your life?

In the third column write what you have found out about yourself from the exercises above.  What do you love?  What makes you happy?  What do you want to learn?  How do you want to live?  What does your ideal life look like?

Finally, in the fourth column write three ways you can start to get the life you really want.  This could be big or small.  Put house on market.  Sign up for Spanish classes.  Stop obsessing about food.  Get a library book about becoming a rose farmer.  Get chickens.

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All of our lists will be different.  I do this regularly.  Sometimes we just need to write things down.  Sometimes the obvious is lost in the hustle and bustle of every day.

Happy Dreaming!  Happy life planning!  Happy living the way you are intended to live.  Whether you are nine or ninety, I wish you your ideal life.

Organizing the Good Life

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I encourage people to follow their dreams and to live a simple life.  A busy life, but on their own terms.  We aren’t quitting our jobs to sit around and watch television!  We do a lot of things to make ends meet and have a little change left over to play.  We farm, we make medicines (though the bulk of the retail aspect I sold), we teach, we write.  We take care of animals, start seedlings, answer emails, promote our farm, and kiss baby lambs.  It’s rough work, I tell you.  But we could easily get overwhelmed with everything that needs to be done.

The office supply section at the store is adorable and fun to look at but those bulletin boards and mini-dry erase boards will fill up what I have to do in the next two hours, let alone the week!  And they are quite pricey.

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I have done a few posts about black board paint.  If you want to learn how to create it, click here.  Here is yet another idea for the blackboard wall (or door, or table, or whatever).

A large section of the kitchen or office, or living room for that matter, wall can be taped off, four layers of black board paint added, let dry for four days, and tada, a charming country organizer has just been made, at a fraction of the price, may I add.

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You could add milking schedules, what the kids need to take to school, countdown to quitting your job, grocery list, to do list, honey do list, menu plan, anything you need to keep organized this week!

We might be really busy, but we are doing what we want, and having a grand time of it.  My uncle passed away yesterday and he led an interesting and fun life, always teasing, always had a glint of mischief in his eye.  May we live our lives to the fullest.  I love this saying below.  It encourages me to live, play, rest, and work hard…and indulge a bit.  Life is short!

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How to Crochet Fingerless Gloves (easy pattern!)

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It is Emily’s birthday Thursday and I wanted to crochet her something along with a regular gift.  I couldn’t decide what.  Since we girls all crochet, we have a bunch of scarves, hats, and gifts from others.  I thought about leg warmers or boot cuffs then I looked down at my own hands.  My good friend, Lisa, knitted me some fingerless gloves to keep my hands warm while I type in the early morning chill.  They are great.  I love them!  So, I thought I would make Mims some too.

Thicker yarn comes together quickly but produces a more bulky (but possibly warmer) glove, and thinner yarn takes forever (my patience is staggering) so I used a medium thick yarn in a lovely coral color.  I a crochet hook that looked like the right hole size for the job, not too big, not too small.  As you may notice, I wing a lot of stuff.  And really, you can’t mess it up.  You can always pull it out.  But have fun choosing the color and feel of your yarn and find a hook that holds that yarn easily and feels good in your hand.  This is unconventional information.  If the gals at knitting club heard me say this I would certainly get a tisk, tisk.

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Chain 14.  Turn.  Double crochet in the third hole and continue across.  (should have 12)

Turn.  Chain 3.  Triple crochet in all the holes across.  (making sure you have 12)

Continue for 7 rows. (total of 9)  Or test it by placing your hand on the square and seeing if when folded that it covers both sides of your hand, not including the thumb.

Slip crochet hook into top hole, grab yarn with hook, and pull through.  Continue down the row 5 holes.

Chain 3.  Triple crochet in next seven holes to end.  Turn.

Chain 3. Triple crochet two more rows.  (Total of 3)  Knot.

Fold piece together and sew up with yarn, folding the thumb to meet the longer side.

Triple crochet in each of the holes along bottom of glove to create a cuff.

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I gave them to Emily early.  It only took me one knitting group meeting to make them and she was there so I just handed her to them because I cannot keep secrets, particularly gifts.  She drives my big truck that doesn’t open without rolling down the window.  She drives every day to take Bret to school and then to work.  I figured these would be a cute way to keep her hands warm while still being able to finagle the carseat and radio!

 

The Importance of Hobbies (doing more of what we love)

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What did you love to do as a kid?   Or a young adult?  I used to love to do many things drawing.  I do a good job of trying to keep up with my hobbies and passions but a few things start to creep in.  My closet is already filled with paintings!  Art supplies and frames cost money.  What will I do with all of them?  I sell about two paintings a year.  Now what do I do with the rest?  And then there is the ever, well, I am not quite as good as other artists…I try to quiet down these rogue thoughts that try to keep me from doing hobbies I love.

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I have moved to an enchanting place.  It is the most beautiful and most magical place I have ever lived.  I have seen bald eagles, two different types of owls, hawks, rabbits, foxes, coyotes, antelopes, horses running across miles and miles of open pasture, and sunsets and sunrises that have left me in awe.  Without the neighbors and buildings so close, like in town, I have been able to greet the dawn as soon as she makes her way over the ridge of prairie grasses and it fills with me a sense of peace as I admire her colors and paintings.  I want to capture them as well.

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I purchased some pastels and paper from the store and woke up before dawn each morning and painted a different scene from each window.  There are more dawns to capture, and sunsets too, as soon as the weather warms.  I placed them in frames that were on sale and will take them to a local coffee shop.

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If you are an artist, a previous artist, or a budding artist, you can call around coffee shops and ask to hang your art work.  Many of them will let you sign up for a month at a time.  They get rotating art from local artists and you get exposure and perhaps sell a piece or two.

Another piece I will display this month.

Another piece I will display this month.

I am also going to look into Etsy.  And art galleries.  And displaying art at our shows (though I do not like doing outdoor markets with art.  Too nerve racking!  One gust of wind and….eek!)  The point is, if we love to do something, even if it doesn’t bring us an income, then we should find ways to incorporate it into our lives and if it is only because things are piling up in the back room that we stop, then we should share our hobbies with the world.

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I gave art as Christmas presents this year and sold one.  This month at the coffee shop I will bring my new pieces and a few of the old.

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The landscape out here is different than any other I have lived in, even though I am a Colorado native, it’s like I have never seen my own state before.  Out here feels like one western painting after another.  Like every piece of fine art portraying western scenes was painted out here.  I also bought an inexpensive set of oil paints.  I used to paint with oils and I would like to try it again.  Why not?  When it gets warmer I will be out on the roadside attempting to capture a snippet of what God’s painting looks like.

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How to price art?  Let’s talk about that.  Few can afford fine art these days.  Don’t price your art according to the huge dealers downtown.  One would be hard-pressed to get $700 in a small town or even a big town these days.  Price it reasonably.  Then you’ll have more room to make more art and a little change in your pocket.  I am going to sell my pastels for $20.  After the 20% the coffee shop takes and the cost of frame I will make $11.  But I loved creating it.  It made me get up and view the dawn, to greet the day, and it was a pleasure pursuing what I love.

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What would you like to do this year?  Grab a sketchbook?  Start quilting?  Start a blog?  Learn to make cheese?  Take a dance class?  Finish a project from a long time ago?  Go to a knitting club?  Let’s spend this year doing as many things as possible that we love!

Starting a Homesteading School

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Several times this year I had us (meaning myself and you readers) all write down dreams, goals, things we want to change in our lives, things that we are holding onto, things that we need to start in order to get our dreams to unfold before us.  For anything you desire or wish for will come to fruition.  Once you put it out there and start planning, it is a done deal.  For us, we longed for a place with more land.  We had truly run out of space at our adorable rental house in town on two-thirds of an acre.  We even dug up the driveway last year to plant more corn and herbs!  Our goats yelling at people walking by and the veritable farm right there in the middle of town was definitely a show-stopper and amazingly fun but we were ready for the next step of our journey.  We prayed and planned though we had no idea how it would even be possible.  We had no money and no credit but we needed a bigger farm and a smaller, quaint homestead with more off grid possibility, and a place where we could use the homesteading skills we had acquired over the years on our practice farms.

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A brief, out of nowhere call from our landlords telling us they needed to sell the house (it looks to be going into foreclosure though) and a trip down Craigslist way and bam we were staring at our dream home.  A tiny hundred-plus year old homestead filled with memories and history on ten acres for rent complete with goat pens and chicken coop, fenced garden, clothes line, wood cook stove, and views for miles.  Nothing is impossible with God indeed!  All for half the price we were paying in bills at the old place.

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There is one more piece to this dream we have concocted.  A school.  I have taught Certified Herbalist Courses for about five years now.  For two years I have taught sporadic homesteading classes in our cramped kitchen.  Soap making, cheese making, fun skills like that.  I enjoy making medicines, but the retail side of it needs to stay small and intimate, helping people directly, so it’s not enough to get us through financially.  That, and teachers must teach.  We go crazy if we don’t!

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Before now I have just offered homesteading classes here and there and have not really promoted them properly but I am now in my place where I can really make this dream come true.  So, I looked at the coming year’s calendar and made a  schedule.  I had already written down sometime this year all of the classes and event we could offer.  I proceeded to take a leap of faith and make this dream come to life.  I guess you will see along with me what transpires!

There is a tab on the menu above that reads “Homesteading School”, all classes and events are posted there.  They are also posted on my website http://gardenfairyapothecary.com and there is a place to pay for and sign up for classes.  I am really excited about this!  Perhaps I will be able to meet some of my readers at a farm event or class.

What dreams are you working on this year?

How To Make Homemade Soap

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Alright, let’s make soap!  It is easy, you can make it however you like, and you will never buy another bar of drying, chemical laden soap again!

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First, gather your ingredients.  You can buy these items online at places like Brambleberry or Essential Depot but I like to support local business so I head down to Buckley’s Homestead Supply in Old Colorado City and pick up what I am missing.

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You will need a digital scale to measure your ingredients.  Place the digital scale in a plastic freezer bag to protect it.  When dealing with the lye use safety glasses and rubber gloves.  But don’t be overly scared of it to the point that you scare yourself out of using it.  I have licked my finger thinking I had coconut oil on it, rubbed my face, dropped it on my bare foot….a bit of good lotion (like my Lavender Lotion) and a washing gets the sting out really quick.  You will also need a plastic pitcher, a plastic spoon, a plastic mixing bowl, and a plastic spatula (see the pattern here?).  I get mine from the dollar store and only use them for soap making.  You will also need a red solo cup, a measuring cup, and a soup pot.  Only the things that touch lye need to remain solely for soap.  My soup pot and measuring cups stay in the kitchen.  You will need an immersion blender and a laser thermometer as well.

You can purchase molds or you can chop the top off of a paper milk carton and use that.

16 oz. of liquid.  I use goat’s milk.  I have also used half goat’s milk and half wine and one time I did half goat’s milk and half coffee.  That was a great bar of soap!  You could use beer, water, or store bought milk.  How about beet juice for the color or green tea?  Just don’t use anything acidic like orange juice or pineapple juice as the lye will react to it.

7.4 oz. of lye.  Pour this into the plastic cup when measuring it on the scale and simply rinse out afterwards.

16 oz. of olive oil

16 oz. of coconut oil

16 oz. of palm oil (I am not crazy about using palm oil but it is what makes the soap hard.  Later we’ll learn to make lard soap and then we won’t need the palm oil.)

2 oz. of castor oil (This is what makes it sudsy.)

2 oz. of essential oil.  Now don’t get crazy and get 2 ounces of cinnamon or something, you don’t want the soap to be super hot!  Try vanilla, or lavender, rose, maybe orange and peppermint, a combination of oils, or pine for Christmas, or maybe just coffee scented if you used coffee as your liquid and skip the essential oils!  I am not a proponent of multi-marketing oils, just find a good essential oil at the local health store at an affordable price and use it.  Don’t use fragrances!

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1. Now that we have everything assembled let’s get started!  Place the liquid in the plastic pitcher and put the plastic spoon in it.  Put your glasses and gloves on and pour the lye into the cup.  Now put the laser thermometer in your apron pocket and take the pitcher and the lye outside.  Make sure there are no chickens around to tip the thing over or curious dog noses!  Slowly pour the lye into the liquid while stirring.  It will get super hot, about 175 degrees and will change color.  We have this outside so we don’t asphyxiate folks in the house.  Outside it will cool faster as well.

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2. Back inside measure all oils, except the essential oils, those go in at the end of the process, and place in a pot.  Warm on a wood cook stove (or regular stove) until the oils have just melted.

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3. Taking temperatures.  Now here is where we get our workout.  Check the temperature of the oils.  You can alter the temps by sticking it in the snow or fridge or reheating it.  The oils will cool down faster than the lye.  Once the lye cools down there is no reheating it so this is the point that you have to be rather diligent about watching temps.  The goal is to get the oil and the lye to 105 degrees at precisely the same time.  There can be a three degree temp difference.  But ideally, 105.  Bring lye in when it is 120 degrees to slow it down while you work on the oil temp.

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4. Prepare the bowl, set up the immersion blender, have the tops off the essential oil ready to pour in all at once and have some paper towel on hand.  Put gloves and glasses on.  When the oil and the lye are ready pour the oil into the bowl, then slowly pour the lye mixture in.  Keep the immersion blender below the liquid line or you will spray soap everywhere!  Blend until the mixture starts to feel like pudding.  When you can swirl the blender (turned off) over the top of the mixture and it makes swirly lines that is called tracing.  Add essential oils, and any additions for exfoliation (oatmeal, coffee grounds, poppy seeds…) and continue to blend until almost cake batter consistency then pour into mold.

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5. Place a piece of cardboard over mold and wrap in a towel.  Leave for 24 hours.  After 24 hours peel back paper or take out of mold and slice with a kitchen knife into desired size.  I generally like one inch thick pieces of soap.  Place small side down on dresser and let cure for four weeks.  Wrap and give as gifts or store in a zip lock bag to retain scent.

Homesteading skills like making soap are fun, save money, and will always come in handy!  Look at our Homesteading School on the menu to see what fun classes are coming up.  We’ll start anew after the holidays.

 

 

 

Decorating a Farmstead Kitchen (and making a chalkboard wall)

The kitchen is the heart of the home, where the fires are burning, where memories are made, where the cook stove will stay warm and where  at the breakfast nook near the warm stove we will play board games on snowy winter days.  Where sustaining food is prepared and the baby plays at my feet while I make a pot of tea.  The kitchen is my favorite room.

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In this kitchen I have a bit of space.  Usually my friends crowd around and chat while we all put finishing touches on drinks and food and inevitably a few are pushed out due to lack of space.  In this kitchen I have seating for four and places to mill around.

This is how I turned an ordinary kitchen added on in the early seventies with peeling linoleum into a culinary oasis.  I take inspirations from Amish, Italian, Pioneer, and Country kitchens.  Combined seamlessly together into what my extended family would call a “Katie kitchen”.

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I do not like overhead lighting so twinkly lights are employed to add charm and light to the house.

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The horrid florescent lamp (those always give off a light similar to horror movies in my mind) was covered with a quaint chicken valance.  Another valance was placed above the window in the kitchen.  Doug installed the curtain hardware eight inches over the window so that plenty of light could come through.

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A sunny place to play cards or have a cup of coffee and read.

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An old cabinet piece that I have had a long time is the base for a bookshelf to make a larger cabinet.  My friend, Nancy’s, chicken tea pot, pitcher, and cookie jar stand among pioneer cookbooks and wine glasses.

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Every nook and cranny, every drawer, every cupboard if filled.  I cannot bring one more thing into this kitchen!  Everything in its place is the mantra here now.  My aprons displayed on a vintage hanger along with Maryjane’s apron invite folks to put one on and start cooking!

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The top of the fridge is always a void of inspiration for me.  This whimsical wind catcher and a pretty enamel bowl fill the space with a little fun.

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The unique part of this room is the chalkboard wall.  Simply tape off a section that you would like to use.  Paint on four coats of chalkboard paint, letting dry in between coats.  Let set for two days.  Peel off tape the first day so that it doesn’t become a permanent frame!

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I added my favorite picture to the board by hanging it on a nail in the middle of the chalkboard.  If this little girl was a blonde, it would be Maryjane.  Maryjane loves her chickens!  Notes or menus can be written on the board.

It is easy to add small touches to any kitchen without spending a lot of money.  Any kitchen can benefit from vintage furniture, whimsical touches that bring a smile, and flowers….and a chalkboard wall.

 

Painted Letters

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It’s too cold still to be gardening here and most of my projects are completed for the winter.  This is the time of year that I recoup, reinspire, rediscover.  I hope you have followed along and completed your lists of things you love, things you are okay with, things you dislike, and things you want to try.  If not, click here!  We have written poetry, and broken writing rules, and today we paint.

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I finished the book “Paris Letters” by Janice Macleod, a lovely tale about a young woman that sold everything she had, and took the leap to Paris.  Where, incidentally, she meets a romantic and not bad looking fellow.  She began to carry watercolors around with her and painted scenes that became stationary for her Paris Letters.

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After completing my list of what I love to do, what I am okay doing, what I dislike doing, what I want to try, I was surprised to see painting on my okay with, not what I can’t wait to do list.  I think by the time I find all the paints, the canvas, the easel, and drag everything where I want it, I am too tired to paint.  Presently, my paintings are being displayed at the local coffee shop.  I did expect to have all new paintings there, but alas I have not painted in a year!

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I decided to go get a two dollar pack of watercolors and watercolor paper.  It fits in my ginormous bag that I carry with me everywhere (filled with books, tinctures, salves, day timer, phone, and Maryjane’s toys).  I put water into a small canning jar and put that in my bag too.  I can easily sit and paint at the spur of the moment.  In two weeks, I have completed five paintings.  None that should win awards, but perhaps delight the recipient.

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I painted an elementary picture of Elsa, the baby goat, beneath an elm tree for my pen pal, Holly.  (Want to be my pen pal?  Click on the pen pal post!)  I painted a rosemary plant and wrote a heartfelt letter to Nancy before she died.  I painted a simple tea cup while at the coffee shop and sent it to my other pen pal, Debbie.  I painted a duck yesterday at the coffee shop and wrote a letter to my great aunt Lila.  Then last night I painted a cast iron skillet for my great aunt Donna.

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Aunt Donna called me a week and a half ago after reading the Homesteading Oven post and said, “Now I know you don’t like electronics, but you need an oven!  How can Shyanne bake without an oven?”  And so, my dear aunt graciously and generously bought us a stove.  So, the skillet will go out in the mail today to serve as a thank you note.

All of a sudden I am painting again and connecting with people.  I encourage you to pick up a two dollar watercolor kit and fool around painting in the coffee shop.  We have time.  It’s not time to garden yet.

Blackboard Doors (and other ideas with paint)

I love easy craft projects that have big impact.  I have been mulling around this idea for a long time.  I wish I hadn’t waited so long!  I love how the doors look.  All you need is a small can of blackboard paint.

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I painted the door leading from the kitchen to the laundry/cat room.  I thought it might be too dark in a room with white cupboards and light wall paper but the final look is dramatic and actually matches the old look of the kitchen.  It brought out the black vintage handles on the antique island and makes a stunning statement in an otherwise plain kitchen.

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I then moved on to the door between the Apothecary and the girls’ bathroom.  We have a bulletin board in the Apothecary that holds all of our orders, tax license, calendar, and notes but it is filled pretty consistently.  The door serves as a blatant place to write my to-do list so that I can stop procrastinating and get stuff done!

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With the left over paint I could paint flower pots to write what they hold. I could paint picture frames and write the date and name of the person, or draw little chalk flowers around it, or give as a gift with a witty saying like, “Happy Birthday!”  I could paint small pieces of wood and use them with produce displays to state prices.  I could paint our antique dining room table!! I could get carried away.

Learning Homesteading Skills (finding teachers)

Our grandparents knew how to do all these things.  Mine laughed when I wanted a farm and wondered why.  Growing up on farms and in the country, in hard times, with so much work, it baffled them that I would run off to the lifestyle that they left willingly.  The skills from that generation and beyond become more and more lost.  No one taught me how to milk a goat when I was a child (which would have been nice since I will be milking in a few short weeks!), no one taught me to garden, or to spin, or to can, or to take care of one day old chicks.  There was no reason to in the middle of Denver!  Over the past years I have tried to accumulate these skills.

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I started with books.  Lots of books.  We are avid readers over here anyway, so I may as well be learning while reading.  And indeed I have picked up many great tips and tried and true ways of doing things from these books.  Many specific skill books though go in one eye and out of my memory faster than a three day old goat can elude me. (Man, they are fast!)

Things like knitting, milking, spinning, I need to see it.  I need to have someone show me step by step then I have it.  Most of the time.

IMG_0526Spinning was not working out for me.  My yarn looked like dreadlocks or clumps of fur.  It did not resemble anything looking like yarn.  My machine would not work.  My friend told me to pour a glass of wine.  I did.  Then I poured three.  Still couldn’t spin.  The spinning wheel anyway.  The teacher I had just kept saying I needed practice.  I could tell there was no more she could teach me.  I called my wine recommending friend.  She came over a week later.

She first noted that my machine was put together backwards.  That the break was on the wrong side.  The tension was all wrong.  She showed me the technique of spinning, which I knew but had been trying without good result.  I sighed and tried the wheel.  And spun.  Yarn.  It looks like yarn!  All I needed was a new teacher.

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In your community you will find people that do what you wish you could do.  Make cheese, spin, can, garden, make herbal medicines, make wine, any number of fabulous homesteading skills.  And most of them are happy to teach you.  You may have to pay a small fee for the lesson.  Or barter.  That is okay because the money you save and the joy you feel while mastering these skills outweighs forty bucks.

I teach canning, crocheting, high altitude baking, gardening, soap making, candle making, soft cheese making, herbal classes, and herbal body product classes.

I need to find a class on how to make hard cheese.  I suppose if I read the cheese making book I bought I can figure it out since I already know how to make soft cheeses.

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I need to learn to milk.  I milked a goat when I worked at an animal shelter some twenty years ago.  I wonder if I will remember.

I want to learn how to knit.  Books and teachers thus far have not been able to help.  Surely there is a patient lady out there with the perfect knitting needles to get me on my way to making socks and sweaters.

We signed up for a bee keeping class.

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I cannot wait to experiment with dying fiber.  I have many plans this year and I hope to teach all of them.  Of course, I could keep all these skills to myself and make money off of the canned goods, the yarn, the farming, the herbal medicines. And I will, because there are folks who would rather I do it.  But for those that want to learn, we must teach what we know.  We must share our knowledge.

And our lessons for the day summed up:

If first you don’t succeed, get another teacher.

Give a man a fish, and you have fed him once. Teach him how to fish and you have fed him for a lifetime.