Farmgirl School

"It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life." -Tolkien

6:30 am: The wind howled at fifty miles an hour all night, folding pieces of the greenhouse and threatening loose objects. My wwoofer, Maycee, and I rapidly pick green tomatoes, filling two large canning pots, saving all we can. The tarp and blankets only cover 15×4 feet of tomato plants. We cover the zucchini and bid farewell to everything else in the gardens. All of the beautiful flowers at their peak. The beans nearly ready, but not quite. The squash and watermelons and peppers and dozens of other vegetables that won’t make it through the sudden cold front that is upon us. Tonight the freeze starts and the snow will come, heavy and suffocating. And cleansing. The fires here in Colorado have been awful and the dense moisture will lower the smoke, clean the air, and usher us into another season.

I mourn the plants I am not ready to see fold back into the earth. This freeze is a good month earlier than expected. Autumn has been sneaking up slowly though. We watched the corn change to crisp seemingly overnight. And birds in masses gathering frantically. The grapes brought in to the winery for crush a month early, as are the pumpkins we brought in the other day. Yes, the seasons change in our lives without us being ready and all we can do is flow.

My husband’s photo of our squash bounty!

8:30 am: My friend Annie that used to live with me (the one who grew up with my children and comes to help me can on the weekends, the one who is now hooked on homesteading after living with me!), she sends me a photo of her new pressure canner with excitement. This lifestyle is captivating. It is addictive and satisfying in a way that is hard to explain. The young people are often just now being introduced to it. And that is good. Our world needs more self sufficient people. More homestead/community minded folks.

10:30 am: The fire is stoked and the heat carries through the house. It seemed strange to be hauling wood in yesterday. It was nearly a hundred degrees outside. The clouds float towards us over the mountains. I look brightly at my shelves, filled with well over three hundred jars of vegetables and preserves for winter. Our friends came to visit us yesterday and stayed for lunch. They brought us a lot of frozen wild meat. We don’t often eat meat because we despise the factory farms of the world. But these items along with what other friends have gifted us, feel like bundles of sustenance, waiting for the dutch oven upon the wood stove. They feel like amazing gifts for winter.

Our pantry wall looks like the finest art installation!

11:30: A large basket of beans was brought in to further dry and to shell in the week ahead. The tomatoes will be set out to turn red. We are full from Kleinur (Icelandic beignets) that I fried this morning. Hot cups of coffee warmed us after scurrying around the farm gathering vegetables and unhooking hoses, checking on the animals, and we are now settled by the fire.

Cherokee black beans will be shelled for soups and many dishes in the coming winter.

The children are coming for a harvest festival here on Saturday. It will be gloriously autumnal by the end of the week with temperatures in the seventies and eighties. We will still have a lot of work to do- with cleaning up the farm, setting up the trellising and posts for the vineyard, fixing the greenhouse, cleaning up garden beds, and canning the rest of the tomatoes, potatoes, and pumpkins. There is sauerkraut on the counter that will be ready to can next week as well. The season comes to an end then we will be vacationing in Colorado wine country and visiting friends.

The new shawl I made on my loom with my favorite colors!

I will then settle in with my loom and create new pieces. Work at the winery on weekends. Enjoy the fruits of our labor of summer. Bid farewell to wwoofers and intense heat, and welcome in fall. Everything has a season.

6 thoughts on “Hooked on Homesteading

  1. papersmiles2015 says:

    Absolutely gorgeous shawl and a very impressive array of canned goods. You have been one busy homesteader. Oh my, I can remember my grandmother telling me about how she always “put up” a barrel of kraut (literally in a wooden barrel) every year and stored it in the cellar. Great memories just like the ones you are creating. Have a wonderful Harvest festival. Hugs, Barbara

    1. Katie Lynn says:

      Hugs to you Barbara! Can’t wait for your letter! I loved all the photos last time!

  2. I love these glimpses into your home steading life. Your shawl is beautiful and thanks for the tip about how to harvest sunflower seeds. 😊

    1. Katie Lynn says:

      I love “sitting” in your garden and visiting Scotland through your blog! Thanks for reading!

  3. Julie P says:

    Your shawl is gorgeous, sad there’s been such a fast end to your garden. 300 jars! Wow! Real shortages here of jars and lids taken to canning in reused screw top jars saved by Charlie and Emily. They’re working out ok and got a good seal so far. Colder nights here now so gathering in what we can may get another VAT of tomato sauce and a few pickles. Must make piccalilli too. Sitting by your wood stove with the autumn chill outside sounds idyllic 😊

    1. Katie Lynn says:

      I should have listened to you back in April about possible canning jar shortages! I just never would have believed it. It’s been a problem here too. My dear friend Annie has been running around getting them off of facebook marketplace!

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