For the Love of Ducks!

Wouldn’t that be a fabulous exclamatory sentence?  “For the love of ducks, get in here!!”  I might start using that.

ducks

I have been talking about getting ducks for years.  I have researched them and coveted them.  Nancy had some ducks this year that she inherited.  They were called Chocolate Runners.  They looked like Walt Disney himself designed them.  They looked like bowling pins, slightly slanted, running about in a pack.  They were so comical and so mesmerizing, Doug and I could not keep from giggling as we watched them.

runners

The things that have kept us from getting ducks are as follows:

1. They are supposedly noisy.  I have tested out my neighbors though and they seem to be immune to a barking dog, bleating goats, humming alpacas, clucking chickens, and an uproariously loud opera singer named Henry the Rooster.  I think they can take a few quacking ducks.

2. Do they need their own coop?  I only have one.  They get into water and may make a mess of the water bowl.  However, the chicken water bowl is my mixing bowl stolen from the kitchen.  (The dog has one, the cats have one, I really do need new mixing bowls!)  So, they can’t make that much of a mess!  I was told today at the feed store that they do eat pine shavings which is less than good for them and that I will need to use straw, which is more odorous, but I suppose I can change it more.

3. Where am I going to get a pond?  I live in town for duck’s sake.  We talked about getting the water feature in the yard fixed that has long been out of use.  It was rotted, holy, and non-working when we moved in.  A child’s swimming pool in that area though could work.  The gal at the feed store said my chickens will drown.  She underestimates the intelligence of my chickens.

4. What the heck do they eat?  I thought maybe layer feed was layer feed but water fowl have their own feed.  Keeping that separate could be an issue.

5. Are they going to catch sight of the fairgrounds and fly south?  Apparently Runner ducks like Nancy’s can only fly three feet up so they aren’t going very far.  Other breeds can have a few feathers clipped with sharp scissors on one side and that takes care of that.

6. How many eggs do they lay?  Cause I have enough free loaders around here.  Duck eggs fetch $8 a dozen at the nearby farmers markets.  Depending on the duck breed, they can lay anywhere from 50-330 eggs per year.  The meat breeds don’t lay as many.  Runner ducks range between 150-300 eggs per year.  More than some of the chickens I have.

duck

Feeling confident, I went to the feed store and pre-ordered my ducks.  Two blue Runners and two chocolate Runners.  Straight run.  Eek.  I asked what if they are all boys?  I can bring them to the animal swap if I don’t want to kill them myself, the clerk says.

Folks, I cannot even put my old, decrepit, eighteen year old dog to sleep for crying out ducks.  How am I going to butcher my ducks?  I will pray for all girls.

I have two choices now to think about.  I can leave them in the same coop as the chickens, keep both their bowls of food there and hope they opt for the correct one for their species.  I can put the swimming pool out by the old water feature and hope the chickens don’t drown.

duckling

Or, I can put them in the goat yard with their own coop.  Maybe there is one on Craig’s List.  They can run around with the goats, have their swimming pool, and I can hope the goats don’t break into their food.  I can totally see Loretta chowing down on duck feed.

I have until April 11th to figure it out.  The ducks arrive then.  This is becoming more of a farm every year!

Vintage Handkerchiefs (a crochet project)

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I love many things from bygone eras, especially vintage wear.  I particularly like the look of handkerchiefs worn about the hair.  I do not wear common head bands as they give me a headache.  I do like my hair out of my face though when I am working around my farm.

I used to make the girls dresses and would sew a matching triangular handkerchief to wear on their heads.  They were adorable.

I also used to collect vintage handkerchiefs and wear them around.  Gorgeous prints, lavender flowers, one that was orange trimmed.  One day when I met Doug’s grandma for lunch some very long time ago, she took one look at my hair covered with the lovely lavender handkerchief and asked horrified, “Why are you wearing that schmatte?’

I was a little taken aback, a lot younger, and truly cared what people thought.  To her, it signified peasant wear, a poor woman, and after World War II and growing up poorer than some, she wanted nothing to do with anything that didn’t hint at affluence.  She was a sweet woman, God rest her soul, but she didn’t have a filter.  I took the handkerchief off and for years did not wear one.

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After seeing Sound of Music once again, I dug through my drawers to find the missing handkerchiefs.  I only found one and it is a bit tattered.  We go to a knitting club at the coffee shop every Monday and I had an idea.  How cute would it be to crochet one?  Not an original idea, I am sure, but original to me!

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First I bought the ribbon yarn that is used in so many scarf patterns.  I carefully crocheted the tops and then the bottoms of the ribbon creating almost a hat, a gorgeous lavender hat, that is actually a handkerchief.  Then I made one with regular yarn.  It, too, turned out cute and will look quite nice holding my hair out of my face during farmer’s markets this year.

Here’s the rough pattern for the regular yarn: (You can use the same pattern for the ribbon yarn just don’t pull all the way through.  One row is crochet the top of the ribbon, second row is the bottom of the ribbon, etc.)

Chain as many as you need for the string to go from ear to ear.  28 is a good place to start.

Then turn it, slip stitch into the first hole then chain three in the second hole.

Triple stitch into each hole up to the second to last hole and turn.

Repeat, gradually decreasing stitches until the end is a peak.

You can be as creative as you wish with this project.

Use a piece of yarn or ribbon and weave through the top.  This ties under your hair.

This came together in about 30 minutes!  Enough time to catch up with the girls, have a cup of coffee, and still get home to make supper.

I’d love to see pictures of your creations.  Katie@Gardenfairyherbal.com

Let’s bring vintage back….I actually don’t mind looking like a peasant!