Lady Bugs in the Window

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My little friend, Shelby, brought me a gift.  I could not imagine what it was.  She held a glass canning jar with a tulle slip of fabric covering the top.  Leaves and a stick decorated the inside of the jar.  Upon closer inspection, little red and black beetles held softly to the inside.  Lady bugs!  My favorite!

Shelby had been raising them as an experiment for girl scouts.  So, when it was time to let them go, she thought of me.  I laid them gently in the pots that line the window.  The indoor farm now has lady bugs.

Last year, when I was telling you about my indoor farm, I mentioned that the biggest problem we encounter indoors are the blasted aphids that decide to move in.  Aphids love them some indoor farms.  It’s like vacation for aphids.  I had mentioned that I needed lady bugs inside, a bunch of wasps, or something to control these buggers.  How pleasant to have lady bugs.  My family had vetoed the wasps.

How does one take care of pet lady bugs?  I placed a small saucer of water out.  Do they drink water?  Is the food and bugs in the window enough for them?

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So, a few things could happen.

1. I may do so brilliantly at this lady bug business that my house is positively swarming with them come spring time.

2. The cats may eat them.

3. They may all die because I have no idea what their needs are.

4. They may thrive within the expanses of the indoor farm windows and keep the aphids away, all while beautifying the gardens and creating a fun scavenger hunt looking for them.  A lady bug landing on your shoulder while drinking Christmas tea would be a lovely gift, don’t you think?

11 Comments Add yours

  1. jeff says:

    ladybugs in the house are not a blessing as they eat the gypsum in your drywall and leave tunnels everywhere in it.

    1. Farmgirl says:

      Well, that’s not good. Since spiders even have trouble surviving the winter here, I won’t worry about it too much! I’ll keep that in mind though.

  2. The Simple Italians says:

    Lucky you!

  3. debweeks says:

    I’ve never purposely brought ladybugs indoors, but in my neck of the woods, they find their way inside. It’s not uncommon for me to find ladybugs sharing our home all winter long and I’ve done nothing special. Hopefully yours will thrive in your home all winter.

    1. Farmgirl says:

      I hope so too! We are a very dry, high altitude, even spiders die off here. So, I do wonder if they will make it.

  4. nicolec says:

    We do everything we can to *keep* them from coming inside here, yet they do anyway, every winter. They don’t damage anything, they just leave dead bodies in all the south-facing windows. I believe the notion they eat drywall to be an urban myth; probably some other bug is to blame and the ladybugs just opportunistically use the existing damage.

    Indoors tend to be too dry for ladybugs (especially if you have electric or wood heat), so leave them some water out. Normally they’d hibernate and not eat all winter, but if you have aphids available, they might indulge.

    1. Farmgirl says:

      Thank you for this information!

  5. jennyvincent says:

    Ibelieve the ladybugs eat drywall too. I googled the question and thats how i came across this page. I just moved into a home in october of 2013, in alabama. Anyways, it has Swarmed with lady bugs since the moment we moved in. Its january and it has only now begun to die down, but while moving things around i saw a tiny hole.as i go to touch it, the drywall paper crumbles to the size of a couple of quarters. There are dead ladybugs and bug poop everywhere. I thought it might have been a mouse hole, but the bodies made me wonder about the ladybugs being the culprits…..

    1. Farmgirl says:

      That is interesting. That must be in more humid climates. It is very dry here. In fact, they were all gone a week later. We love to see them in the summer. They do help with the “bad” bugs and are such a delight to see four months a year!

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